Paarl Golf Club is maintained during lockdown and we are giving up greens for adoption

A big word of thanks goes out to all the individuals who give up their valuable lockdown time to make sure we have a fully functional golf course when we go out of lockdown again. Thanks also to all the residents and other members who keep on motivating the team, as well as to give their names up for any additional tasks that might be needed during this time.

 

Should any member staying on the estate like to help please be in contact with me via manager@paarlgc.co.za or 082 373 4455.

Thank you to all who refrain from using the golf course during this period. Not only is it illegal to do that but we also need to give the course the rest it deserves.

We have started an adopt a green concept where residents close to a specific green becomes an observer on behalf of the club, as well as to give personal attention to that specific green. I have the following people attending to the following greens and from the list it would be clear that I still need quite a number of people to attend to all 27 greens.

Green 1:
Green 2:
Green 3:
Green 4:
Green 5: Dawie and Yvette Theron
Green 6:
Green 7:
Green 8:
Green 9:
Green 10: Willem Pretorius and Alida Kotzee
Green 11: Willem Pretorius and Alida Kotzee
Green 12: Steph Lotz and son
Green 13: Christian van Schalkwyk
Green 14: Herman Matthee
Green 15:
Green 16:
Green 17: Jacques, Ruan and Loween Olivier
Green 18: Werner Bernhardt
Green 19: Pieter Joubert
Green 20: Johan van Zyl
Green 21: Annemie du Toit and Helaine Strydom
Green 22: George Bezuidenhout and Franz Lohbauer
Green 23: Dawie and Linki Malan
Green 24: Lana Ehlers and Family
Green 25: TBC Have a person ready.
Green 26: Anton, Alma and Jere Brits
Green 27:
Anton, Alma and Jere Brits

Please let me know which green you would like to adopt and I will come and “train” you on what to do as well as to provide you with the necessary tools and material to do that. Our next adoption will be the fairways so start thinking what you would like to help with. Fairways would mostly be filling up of divots and flattening the mole heaps. Sound easy enough? 

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A big word of thanks needs to go out to quite a number of members who decided together to create a Covid-19 disaster fund for Paarl Golf Club. These funds will be used to ensure that people who were reliant on the golf club to be fully functional can have some “income” during the lock down period. These are the caddies, the waiters and barmen at Golfing Goat. Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund please feel free to use the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name

Banking details

Bank
: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name 

A quick feedback on this initiative is that we have secured close to R100 000 in this fund that will help a lot of people functioning at the club without an income during this period. Should the lockdown be extended we now have some funds to work with to ensure some income to those that were reliant on golfers on the course.  

King Louis auction

We are going to celebrate Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

 

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

This bottle, together with a photograph of Louis taken during that particular Open, is framed in a once-in-a-lifetime memory of this momentous occasion.

 

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector's Edition wine. You may ask "What does that have to do with Louis who has his own brand of wine?" It is actually very simple. It is the one wine that has got two 'o's in its name, as in Oosthuizen.  
 

Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anton Bezuidenhout who identified the gentleman on the left as Dan du Plessis (long standing member at Durbanville and according to Anton always dressed in jacket and tie for the prizegiving ceremony). Now we just need the man to the right of Allistair. Still unknown.
 
 
Thanks to Anville van Wyk who helped with the man on the left to be our own Peter Dryer who was a previous captain of PGC and did a lot for PGC over the years. The man on the right was Boland Golf Union President at that point in time, but we still need his name.

 

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Again Anville van Wyk identified the man in the middle to be Edwin Grobbelaar, who was a member at PGC for many years. We still need the two gentlemen on the side of Edwin so I wil run with the same photo this week.

 
Know your birdies from your eagles

Fiery Necked Nightjar (Afrikaanse Naguil)

 
   

Description

It is at this time that the ever present and humble Fiery-necked Nightjar (Caprimulgus pectoralis) drums out its distinctive and characteristic call described by birders as “good Lord deliver us”. The call is particularly audible through the full moon phase, less so on darker nights.

Many of you will have encountered the Fiery-necked Nightjar on your evening game drives. It is the most common Nightjar, about 23cms in size, and is nocturnal by habit, feeding on insects which fly about after dark. Although this Nightjar may choose to hunt its dinner from arboreal posts, it is very often found sitting on road surfaces. They are often blinded by oncoming vehicle headlights, “sitting tight” until the very last second, before flying off in a disorientated manner. They are very well camouflaged. No wonder we unfortunately see so many of them succumb as road kills.

The Fiery-necked Nightjar was first described by Cuvier around 1816. Other common names for this bird are South African Nightjar, Pectoral Nightjar, Cuvier’s Nightjar and African Dusky Nightjar. In Afrikaans, it is called Afrikaanse naguil. Fiery-necked Nightjars have a very large range, estimated at over 4 500 000 square kilometers, and therefore exceeds the thresholds for vulnerable range sizes. Its population is considered to be stable. It occurs widely in Africa, ranging from South Africa as far north as Kenya. It enjoys the lower elevations in southern Africa and is scarce in the dry regions.

Behaviour and feeding

They are primary nocturnal birds, and is usually spotted during night time game drives. They are usually difficult to spot during day time with their camouflage type patterns which resembles bark and leaves.

The Fiery Necked Nightjar is primarily a solitary bird, which is very agile in flight. This enables them to catch insects without much effort. Their large eyes enable them to hunt effectively in the dark. They can open their mouths extremely large, which enables them to catch insects much more efficient during flight.


The Fiery Necked Nightjar has as well a special middle claw (pectern) which enables them to groom themselves, and get rid of parasites and dust.

The Fiery Necked Nightjar is Insectivorous and feeds primarily on: Beetles, butterflies and moths, cockroaches, termites and mantis, lacewings and antlions, grasshopper’s bee’s wasps and ants and flies.

They usually forage at dusk up until the middle of the night, or longer if the moon provides a bit of light. They like to hunt from a branch, and when catching a juicy insect then it will usually return to the same perch to feed.

Breeding

Breeding occurs during the months from August to January, the hens laying their eggs on bare ground. Both sexes take turn to incubate the eggs (18 days) and look after the chicks. The chicks are able to fly when they are about 18 to 20 days old. Fiery-necked Nightjars are monogamous and mate for life. Both sexes have almost similar plumage.


Golf quote of the week
 


This mail was sent to {{contact.contact_email}} by Werner Bernhardt and is provided as a service for the members and guests of Paarl Golf Club and the customers of the Paarl Golf Club


RetailTribe: Unit 8, Blaauwklip 1 | Blaauwklip Office Park | R44 | Stellenbosch | South Africa | +27 (0)21 880 2693
Trouble viewing this newsletter? View it online | Download a printer friendly copy
Subscribe here | Unsubscribe here